2015

2015, January We have winter flowers in the form of Winter Heliotrope (Aldington road by the Wild Animal park) and Gorse (Airfield) in flower.

.(click on images to enlarge, all pictures taken by Nick Hollands)

Winter Heliotrope

Winter Heliotrope

Gorse

Gorse

the bird count for January was around 40.

Stonechats, a pair have been wintering on the Airfield

Stonechat

Stonechat Stonechat

Stonechat

February, the bird count is 46 and the Grey Herons are starting to nest in Lympne Park wood

Grey Heron

Grey Heron

Grey Heron

Grey Heron

Grey Heron

Grey Heron

Grey Heron

Grey Heron

Grey Heron

Grey Heron

Some fungi have come through the winter the Jews ear fungus can be seen on dead wood (these on the footpath near Lympne Place school)

Jews ear

Jews ear

Jews ear

Jews ear

Turkey tail Bracket fungus

Turkey tail Bracket fungus

Turkey tail bracket fungus  (Aldington road near Lympne industrial park)

The winter Heliotrope and Gorse flower all winter and are still in flower. Snowdrops are up and on mild days visited by early bees.(Lympne church)

Snowdrops

Snowdrops

 

Early bee on snowdrop (1024x584)Early bee on snowdrop (2) (1024x614)

 

 

Common Buzzard

Common Buzzard

Common Buzzard

Common Buzzard

A Common Buzzard.   (Wild Animal Park, car park)

 

 March    With Spring around the corner wild flowers are becoming more abundant. Primroses, Violets, and Snowdrops are now joined by Coltsfoot,(Lympne Airfield)  Lesser Celandine and Red Dead Nettle(Lympne Airfield).

Coltsfoot

Coltsfoot

Coltsfoot close up

Coltsfoot close up

Coltsfoot

Coltsfoot

Coltsfoot

Coltsfoot

Lesser Celandine

Lesser Celandine

Lesser Celandine

Lesser Celandine

Lesser Celandine

Lesser Celandine

Primrose

Primrose

Primrose

Primrose

Red dead nettle

Red dead nettle

Red dead nettle

Red dead nettle

Snowdrops

Snowdrops

Sweet Violet

Sweet Violet

Sweet Violet

Sweet Violet

These Turkey tail Fungus were found on fallen timber on Lympne Airfield by Frances Jordan

Turkey tail fungus

Turkey tail fungus

Turkey tail fungus

Turkey tail fungus

The Chiffchaff is migrating warbler, although some overwinter, is a sign of spring.

Chiffchaff

Chiffchaff

Chiffchaff (3) (1024x611)

Chiffchaff

 

The Early Bumblebee is one of the first of the Bumblebees to be seen in Spring

Early Bumblebee on Violets (1) (1024x767)

Early Bumblebee

Early Bumblebee on Violets (2) (1024x768)

Early Bumblebee

Early Bumblebee on Violets (3) (1024x768)

Early Bumblebee

Early Bumblebee on Violets (4) (1024x763)

Early Bumblebee

Heron on nest (1024x768)

Heron on nest

Honey bee on Violets (1) (1024x678)

Honey bee on sweet violets

Honey bee on Violets (2) (1024x678)

Honey bee on sweet Violets

Honey bee on Violets (1024x628)

Honey bee on sweet Violets

Bees and other insects are taking advantage of the early pollen and nectar source from Alexanders a green/yellow flower now blooming.

Honey bee on Alexanders

Honey bee on Alexanders

Bee Orchid

Bee Orchid

Bee Orchid leaves just emerging

Bee Orchid leaves just emerging

The leaves of the Bee Orchids are just beginning to show.

(lympne Airfield)

Close up Song Thrush

Close up Song Thrush

Song Thrush pictured through patio doors in a house on Stone street Lympne.

The early Dog violet can be seen in the old quarry between Isis close/Octavian drive and Roseacre wood.

Early Dog Violet

Early Dog Violet

Early Dog Violet

Early Dog Violet

The Forest Cuckoo bee was pictured on Alexanders along the path overlooking Portus Lemanis

Forest cuckoo bee

Forest cuckoo bee

Forest cuckoo bee

Forest cuckoo bee

The first Wasp of 2015, because of the date 18/03/2015 this is probably a Queen

Common Wasp Queen

Common Wasp Queen

A regular visitor to a garden in Stone St  Lympne, Britain’s smallest bird, a Goldcrest

Goldcrest

Goldcrest

Goldcrest

Goldcrest

Goldcrest

Goldcrest

Goldcrest

Goldcrest

April

Spring is well on its way with spells of warm sunshine and early flowers in bloom Solitary bees are emerging and feeding on nectar and pollen from Alexanders and Lesser Celandine, also around are a parasite of the solitary bee the Bee-fly.

Massed group of Lesser Celandine

Massed group of Lesser Celandine

Close up of Lesser Celandine

Close up of Lesser Celandine

Primrose

Primrose

Primrose close up

Primrose close up

Solitary Bee possible Andrena species

Solitary Bee possible Andrena species

Solitary Bee possible Andrena species

Solitary Bee possible Andrena species

Solitary Bee possible Andrena species

Solitary Bee possible Andrena species

Solitary Bee possible Andrena species

Solitary Bee possible Andrena species

Dark edged Beefly

Dark edged Beefly

Dotted Beefly

Dotted Beefly

Seven Spot Ladybirds are coming out of their winter hiding places.

7 Spot Ladybird

7 Spot Ladybird

7 Spot Ladybird

7 Spot Ladybird

7 Spot Ladybird

7 Spot Ladybird

Goat willow/Pussy willow and other Willows are flowering attracting Honey bees and Bumblebees. The first Swallows are around in neighboring West Hythe, so it will not be long before they are seen here.

Goat Willow

Goat Willow

Goat Willow

Goat Willow

Goat Willow

Goat Willow

Tree Bumblebee

Tree Bumblebee

Honey bee on Goat Willow showing pollen sacs

Honey bee on Goat Willow showing pollen sacs

Honey bee on Goat Willow showing pollen sacs

Honey bee on Goat Willow showing pollen sacs

Honey bee on Goat Willow showing pollen sacs

Honey bee on Goat Willow showing pollen sacs

While looking for Early Purple Orchids in some woodland I came across some Blue Anemones, according to my wild flower books they are an introduced species, but really spectacular when seen in large spreads.

Blue Anemone

Blue Anemone

Blue Anemone

Blue Anemone

Massed Blue Anemones

Massed Blue Anemones

Mixture of Blue and white Anemones

Mixture of Blue and white Anemones

White Anemone

White Anemone

White Anemone

White Anemone

Late April, more wild flowers can be found including Early Purple Orchids

Early Purple Orchid

Early Purple Orchid

Early Purple Orchid

Early Purple Orchid

Early Purple Orchid

Early Purple Orchid

Green Alkanet and Honesty

Green Alkanet

Green Alkanet

Green Alkanet

Green Alkanet

Honesty

Honesty

Honesty

Honesty

On warm sunny days look out for Common Lizards basking on exposed rock or timber,

Common Lizard

Common Lizard

Common Lizard

Common Lizard

Common Lizard

Common Lizard

A Northern Wheatear on Lympne Airfield

Wheatear

Wheatear

Wheatear

Wheatear

Wheatear

Wheatear

Tawny mining bee from my garden.

Tawny mining bee

Tawny mining bee

Tawny mining bee

Tawny mining bee

Tawny mining bee

Tawny mining bee

Some more flowers from around lympne

Ramsons

Ramsons

Ramsons

Ramsons

GreaterStichwort

GreaterStichwort

Bluebell

Bluebell

Wild Wood Anemone

Wild Wood Anemone

Wild Wood Anemone

Wild Wood Anemone

Red Campion

Red Campion

Bluebell

Bluebell

Daisy  close up

Daisy close up

Cuckoo flower

Cuckoo flower

Cuckoo flower

Cuckoo flower

Cuckoo flower

Cuckoo flower

Blackthorn blossom

Blackthorn blossom

May/June More wild flowers are evident Blackthorn has given way to Hawthorn. Another member of the Orchid family the Common Twayblade can be found in a couple of areas in our village,

Hawthorn blossom

Hawthorn blossom

Pink Hawthorn an introduced variety

Pink Hawthorn an introduced variety

Pink Hawthorn an introduced variety

Pink Hawthorn an introduced variety

Common Twayblade

Common Twayblade

Common Twayblade

Common Twayblade

Common Twayblade

Common Twayblade

Common Twayblade

A Southern Marsh Orchid is showing, not quite at its best yet.

Southern Marsh Orchid

Southern Marsh Orchid

Daylight flying moths like the Cinnabar Moth are searching out Ragwort to lay their eggs on.

The Cinnabar moth

The Cinnabar moth

The Cinnabar moth

The Cinnabar moth

Grassland Butterflies like the Common Blue are on the wing, as are Red Admiral and Small Tortoiseshell which can be found sunning themselves on paths and roads.

Male Common Blue

Male Common Blue

Male Common Blue

Male Common Blue

Female Common Blue

Female Common Blue

Female Common Blue

Female Common Blue

Small Tortoiseshell

Small Tortoiseshell

Red Admiral

Red Admiral

More pictures of reptiles from the former Airfield, Grass Snakes,  2 colour variations from the green and black to the plain green.

Grass Snake

Grass Snake

Grass Snake

Grass Snake

Grass Snake

Grass Snake

Grass Snake

Grass Snake

Grass Snake

Grass Snake

Grass Snake

Grass Snake

More invertebrates about include Damselflies and Dragonflies

Large Red Damselfly

Large Red Damselfly

Large Red Damselfly

Large Red Damselfly

Emperor Dragonfly

Emperor Dragonfly

Azure Damselfly

Azure Damselfly

Azure Damselfly

Azure Damselfly

The Bee Orchids are just coming into flower the recent rain has saved the Southern Marsh Orchid which was looking a bit sorry for itself, and new for me 2 Common Spotted Orchids also on the former Lympne Airfield.

(click on images to enlarge)

Southern Marsh Orchid

Southern Marsh Orchid

Southern Marsh Orchid

Southern Marsh Orchid

Bee Orchid

Bee Orchid

Bee Orchid

Bee Orchid

Bee Orchid

Bee Orchid

Bee Orchid

Bee Orchid

Common Spotted Orchid

Common Spotted Orchid

Common Spotted Orchid

Common Spotted Orchid

Bee Orchid

Bee Orchid

Bee Orchid

Bee Orchid

Common Spotted Orchid

Common Spotted Orchid

Common Spotted Orchid

Common Spotted Orchid

With the discovery of the first Pyramidal Orchid this year  by Frances Jordan, the village has 6 Orchid species, 4 of which can be found on the former Lympne Airfield

Pyramidal Orchid

Pyramidal Orchid

More wild flowers

Common Mallow

Common Mallow

Meadow and Creeping Buttercup

Meadow and Creeping Buttercup

Woody Nightshade

Woody Nightshade

Herb-Robert

Herb-Robert

Hedgerow Cranesbill

Hedgerow Cranesbill

Grass Vetchling

Grass Vetchling

Field Speedwell

Field Speedwell

Field for-get-me-not

Field for-get-me-not

Scarlet Pimpernel

Scarlet Pimpernel

June/July

More Butterfly species are on the wing now these include Skippers Meadow Brown and Marbled White.

Large Skipper

Large Skipper

Marbled White

Marbled White

Marbled White

Marbled White

Marbled White close up

Marbled White close up

Meadow Brown

Meadow Brown

More flowers and wildlife about Lympne now,

White Tailed

White Tailed

Yarrow

Yarrow

Tree Bumblebee

Tree Bumblebee

Tall Melilot

Tall Melilot

Tall Melilot

Tall Melilot

Speckled Wood

Speckled Wood

speckled bush-cricket

speckled bush-cricket

speckled bush-cricket

speckled bush-cricket

Small Tortoiseshell

Small Tortoiseshell

Small Heath

Small Heath

Small Heath

Small Heath

RedTailed

RedTailed

Red Admiral

Red Admiral

Potter or Mason wasp

Potter or Mason wasp

Perforate St Johns-wort

Perforate St Johns-wort

Painted Lady

Painted Lady

Musk Mallow

Musk Mallow

Migrant Hawker

Migrant Hawker

Humming Bird-Hawk moth

Humming Bird-Hawk moth

Humming Bird-Hawk moth

Humming Bird-Hawk moth

Humming Bird-Hawk moth

Humming Bird-Hawk moth

Humming Bird-Hawk moth

Humming Bird-Hawk moth

Holly Blue

Holly Blue

Holly Blue

Holly Blue

Harlequin Ladybird

Harlequin Ladybird

Common Footman

Common Footman

Common Mallow

Common Mallow

Fleabane

Fleabane

Gate Keeper

Gate Keeper

Common Carder

Common Carder

Common Carder

Common Carder

Common Blue female

Common Blue female

Common Blue

Common Blue

Common Blue

Common Blue

Comma

Comma

Buff Tailed Queen

Buff Tailed Queen

Buff Tailed

Buff Tailed

Agrimony

Agrimony

Great Green  Bush Cricket close up

Great Green Bush Cricket close up

Great Green Bush Cricket

Great Green Bush Cricket

Great Green Bush Cricket

Great Green Bush Cricket

Autumn

The last of our Bee species to emerge is with us, busily feeding on Ivy flowers for the main.

The Ivy bee (Colletes hederae) is a solitary mining bee that looks like a ginger Honey bee. These bees were first recorded in the UK in 2001

Honey bee

Honey bee

Ivy bee

Ivy bee

Ivy bee

Ivy bee

Ivy bee

Ivy bee

Another recent arrival in the UK is the colourful Wasp Spider, September through to the early winter is the best time to find these Spiders low down in long grass, the 20mm spiders are the mature females.

Wasp Spider

Wasp Spider

Wasp Spider

Wasp Spider

Wasp Spider (4) (1024x778)

Wasp Spider

Wasp Spider

Wasp Spider

Wasp Spider

Wasp Spider

Wasp Spider

Wasp Spider

Wasp Spider

Other wildlife still to seen on warm days basking in the sun on rocks or fallen timber are Common Lizards and Dragonflies like Common Darters and Migrant Hawkers.

Common Darter

Common Darter

Common Darter

Common Darter

Common Darter close up

Common Darter close up

Common Lizard

Common Lizard

Common Lizard

Common Lizard

Common Lizard

Common Lizard

Common Lizard

Common Lizard

Migrant Hawker

Migrant Hawker

Fungi   The time of the Toadstool is with us, here are some seen in October, including one rare Devil`s finger or Octopus Stinkhorn

Devils fingers

Devils fingers

Devils fingers

Devils fingers

Velvet shank fungus

Velvet shank fungus

Stump Puffball

Stump Puffball

Birch polypore

Birch polypore

Angel`s Bonnet

Angel`s Bonnet

Another unusual fungi has turned up on Lympne Airfield, found by Frances Jordan, Fairy Fingers or White Spindles.

 Fairy fingers

Fairy fingers

 Fairy fingers

Fairy fingers

 Fairy fingers

Fairy fingers

 Fairy fingers

Fairy fingers

30/12/2015 Mid Winter.

The mild weather continues garden plants continue to flower early Daffodils are out, wildflowers are showing well, the Winter Heliotrope are in full bloom as expected, Violets and lesser Celandine, spring flowers, are blooming early. Honey Bees are foraging on the Winter Heliotrope, and my first Snowdrop of the season was seen at Lympne Church.

Common stump Britlestem Mushroom

Common stump Brittle- stem Mushroom

Early Violets

Early Violets

Honey Bee on Winter Heliotrope

Honey Bee on Winter Heliotrope

Honey Bee on Winter Heliotrope leaf

Honey Bee on Winter Heliotrope leaf

Snowdrop

Snowdrop

Winter Heliotrope

Winter Heliotrope

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